Home Camera Blackmagic URSA Mini Test Part 1: Overexposure and Skin Tone

Blackmagic URSA Mini Test Part 1: Overexposure and Skin Tone

written by Shane Hurlbut, ASC

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Lydia and I wish all of you a wonderful holiday season and a prosperous New Year.  We want to thank you for your support and loyal following.  We also appreciate all that you share, tweet, and Instagram about us and our unique resource for filmmakers all over the world.  

The more we share, the more we grow as artists.

We have so many exciting things in store for you in 2017 and want to give you a taste of what many of you have been asking for—my analysis of the Blackmagic URSA Mini.

YEEEAAAAHHHHHHH!!!!!

So sorry for the delay. It’s weird how spending 8 months in Prague shooting a feature can delay your testing.  HA! HA!

This test will be broken up into 9 parts so that you can digest it all. At the end of this article is a quick look at we’ll be going over in future installments at Shane’s Inner Circle. If you’re not already a member, now’s the perfect time to join and take advantage of all our resources, and take your film career to the next level!

I will take the URSA Mini to its breaking point and show you what it can and cannot do. You’ll learn exactly where its strengths lie and also its shortcomings. Many of you have already chosen to create with this camera, but I also know several of you are still on the fence. This test series will provide you with all the necessary information to make that decision.

For a more comprehensive perspective, Shane’s Inner Circle is your spot. Members at the time of this release will have access to my in-depth analysis and commentary on each test. I will take you step by step through each section and tell you exactly what I’m thinking, and explain my reasoning of each point. Understanding how we come to our final analysis is just as important as the results themselves.

Creating our in-depth tests takes days of prep and dozens of crew members to produce. We spend weeks in post editing and grading, and most of all, really analyzing what we see and how best to work with our footage. We pride ourselves with this kind of investment in our tests because it’s this level of detail, this level of passion and commitment, that keeps raising the bar for our community and ensures that we keep pushing our industry forward.

Coming in early 2017, Parts 4-9 will each cover advanced techniques in color grading with these color spaces—which can be difficult to master.  My colorist & DIT, Derek Johnson, will take you through our process, explain short cuts, and starting points that will put you on the right track. We will also discuss how you can get the best out of your camera’s sensor during both day and night shoots, along with the accessories it will take to achieve a clean, professional image.

Let’s get this PARTY started!

Now we are going to attack the other end of the latitude test. Instead of digging into the blacks when it’s underexposed, I want to see what we can pull out of the image when it’s overexposed. We are going to start (+/-0) and overexpose the sensor in ½-stop increments. Hopefully we can find what the “sweet spot” is for this camera when adding light.

To start things off, here are the settings we are going with. We rolled the camera at 23.98fps, capturing in 4.6K RAW Lossless and with a shutter angle of 180°. For this round of the test, we are setting the ISO to 800.

Ungraded +/-0 Exposure vs. Graded +/-0 Exposure

**The key light is reading at f/2, which sets the us at +/-0 exposure**

Already at ISO 800 at (+/-0) exposure and it feels underlit. The skin tones look nice and the colors feel rich, but when it comes to levels, I’m not getting the pop that I want on the overall image. If I bring this camera on set, I’m going to pump more light than what my light meter is saying. This camera wants LIGHT!

Ungraded +0.5 Overexposed vs. Graded +0.5 Overexposed

**The key light is reading at f/2 5/10, which overexposes our sensor by a ½-stop.**

Now we are a ½-stop over and it’s starting to look better at ISO 800. It’s not where I exactly want it but I can definitely see a difference from when we were at (+/-0) exposure. I could see myself using this in certain scenarios on set.

Ungraded +1 Overexposed vs. Graded +1 Overexposed

**The key light is reading at f/2.8, which overexposes our sensor by 1-stop.**

Now I’m starting to feel like we are in the pocket of the sensor. At 1-stop over at ISO 800, it feels like a good exposure on them and it’s balancing well with the background. It has more snap than what we felt at ½-stop over or at (+/-0) exposure.

Ungraded +1.5 Overexposed vs. Graded +1.5 Overexposed

**The key light is reading at f/2.8 5/10, which overexposes our sensor by 1 ½-stops.**

I really like what’s going on here. At 1 ½-stops over, I feel like their skin is alive and that it beautifully renders the skin tones. Everything seems to really come together in the colors and it’s noiseless from what I can see. I would recommend to have your target settings be ISO 800 at 1 ½-stops over. This camera wants light and I feel that it’s not going to be the type of camera you want to underexpose.

This is the exciting part. We’ve found an area that looks really, really good. Now we can see where the image falls apart and how much we are allowed to pump into the sensor before we can’t bring it back.

Ungraded +2 Overexposed vs. Graded +2 Overexposed

**The key light is reading at f/2.8, which overexposes our sensor by 2-stops.**

At 2-stops over we are still looking very good. I don’t see anything on the verge of overexposing and blowing out. The image looks stable and has a nice pop to it. It doesn’t seem too bright yet, so this would be a good setting to use if you wanted to match your exposure at 1 ½-stops over.

Ungraded +2.5 Overexposed vs. Graded +2.5 Overexposed

**The key light is reading at f/2.8 5/10, which overexposes our sensor by 2 ½-stops.**

Now we are getting to the point where it feels like there is a tad bit more light than I would want. The image is still holding together and I don’t see any problem areas just yet.

Graded +1.5 Overexposed vs. Color Corrected To Match Graded +2.5 Overexposed

Now we are going to cross-compare 1 ½-stops over vs. 2 ½-stops over. You can tell that both Monette and Chelsea’s faces are a bit hotter. The light is wrapping around their faces illuminating more in the image.
Now when we bring it back to match 1 ½-stops over, it holds really well. There isn’t a massive shift in skin tones and light levels. I don’t see much of an increase in noise. I would say you could safely overexpose the sensor by 2 ½-stops and still have a good image to work with in post.

Ungraded +3 Overexposed vs. Graded +3 Overexposed

**The key light is reading at f/4, which overexposes our sensor by 3-stops.**

At 3-stops over you can definitely see that Monette’s skin is starting to bloom.  In comparison to 1 ½-stops over, it just looks too hot on her face. I think this proves that the “sweet spot” of this camera is 1 ½-stops overexposed at ISO 800.

Now we are really starting to see where we need to expose this camera. Just taking a light meter reading or setting your IRE values at 40-50 isn’t going to cut it. I’d set my IRE values at 55-65, which is about 1 ½-stops over for this camera.

Ungraded +3.5 Overexposed vs. Graded +3.5 Overexposed

**The key light is reading at f/4 5/10, which overexposes our sensor by 3 ½-stops.**

At 3 ½-stops over, Monette, is blooming even more. You can tell when this camera overexposes the skin it starts to turn yellow in the hot spots. But watch how we can bring all that information back when we color correct it to match our 1 ½-stops overexposed.

Graded +1.5 Overexposed vs. Color Corrected To Match Graded +3.5 Overexposed

Now you can start to see that the image is hot in the RAW ungraded file, compared to our 1 ½-stops over. So let’s reorient our eyes and cross-compare our 3 ½-stops over to our prefered 1 ½-stops over.

You can see that Monette has clipped compared to 1 ½-stops over. But when we bring it back— BAM! It’s still looking very, very good. This tells me at 3 ½-stops over you can still bring the image back, get the skin tones right, and balance the image. You won’t run into too many problems when you overexpose at these levels.

This is telling me that we can start to get extreme with this camera in overexposure.  We’ve found out while testing underexposure, we can’t get so extreme. This verifies that this camera needs light to succeed. It has a much better range at holding overexposure than it does holding underexposure. This is very reminiscent to how film would react.

Ungraded +4 Overexposed vs. Graded +4 Overexposed

**The key light is reading at f/5.6, which overexposes our sensor by 4-stops.**

Ungraded +4.5 Overexposed vs. Graded +4.5 Overexposed

**The key light is reading at f/5.6 5/10, which overexposes our sensor by 4 ½-stops.**

So now we are 4 ½-stops over and Monette is nuked. We are at the point where there is practically no detail on her face and the same is starting to happen with Chelsea.

Graded +1.5 Overexposed vs. Color Corrected To Match Graded +4.5 Overexposed

When you look at the RAW file at 4 ½-stops over, you can’t really tell if you’re running into problems clipping. Once you put the look on, then it really becomes apparent that you are overloading the sensor. Crazy enough, when looking at the clipped image, it doesn’t seem like you could bring it back! Wrong—it’s all still there. It’s starting to get a little milky in the mids but it’s not bad at all. At 4 ½-stops over, it’s 100% still a workable image.  

Ungraded +5 Overexposed vs. Graded +5 Overexposed

**The key light is reading at f/8, which overexposes our sensor by 5-stops.**

Here we are at 5-stops over on the sensor. You can see that we are still retaining a lot of detail in the ungraded file vs. what is shown the graded file. There is information tucked away in those hot spots. Until you underexpose this sensor, you will start to lose information and the image will break apart.

Ungraded +5.5 Overexposed vs. Graded +5.5 Overexposed

**The key light is reading at f/8 5/10, which overexposes our sensor by 5 ½-stops.**

Now we are 5 ½-stops over and we are really starting to push this sensor.

What we are learning here is that we can overexpose and let things look a little hot in regard to our LUTs that we have on the camera. It’s great knowing that this sensor is going to hold on to  that information in the RAW ungraded file and we’ll have the capability to dig into that underexposure—which really isn’t underexposure—and we’re going to expose more of the shadows. This will give us the latitude to let the highlights blowout, so we can bring those back in the RAW file.

Graded +5.5 Overexposed vs. Color Corrected To Match Graded +5.5 Overexposed

Looking at the RAW file, I think it’s safe to say that we have started to clip at 5 ½-stops. So when we bring it back, you can see that her cheeks are clipped. We’ve lost that detail in her skin but it still looks good for the amount of detail we are able to retain. At 5 ½-stops, this camera is holding most of that detail in the image. I would say that this is the breaking point for the camera and any farther it really becomes an unusable image.

What Have We Learned?

  • This sensor holds extremely well when pumping in the added light.
  • This is a sensor that absolutely needs light and you don’t want to try and underexpose it.
  • When the sensor gets close to clipping, you can see some yellow shift in the skin tone.
  • About 5 ½-stops over, the image starts to hit the breaking point and becomes smokey. You can see that it clips in the RAW file and has lost some detail in the image.  

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Overexposure at ISO 1600:

Now we are going to dig into ISO 1600 to see how it performs when overexposed. We saw that at ISO 800, it took a lot of light to start breaking apart the image. It was surprising to see how light hungry this sensor is and how much detail it could hold—even when it clipped in the look.

To start things off, here are the settings we went with. We rolled the camera at 23.98fps, capturing in 4.6K RAW Lossless and with a shutter angle of 180°. For this round of the test, we set the ISO to 1600.

Ungraded +/-0 Exposure vs. Graded +/-0 Exposure

**The key light is reading at f/2, which sets us at +/-0 exposure**

So we are going to do the same thing as the last test. My light meter is reading at f/2 and our lens is set to f/2. We are right at exposure and I’m starting to see some noise in the image. It’s not as bad as it was outside at ISO 1600, but it’s definitely more pronounced than when we had our ISO set to 800 at (+/-0) exposure. The image also feels bit underexposed, which exactly how we felt at ISO 800. So if I meter at a f/2, I’m definitely going to pump in more light to try and make that picture snap.

With this lighting scenario, we want to find where that magic is and try to put this camera into that pocket.

Ungraded +0.5 Overexposed vs. Graded +0.5 Overexposed

**The key light is reading at f/2 5/10, which overexposes our sensor by a ½-stop.**

At ½-stop over on the sensor it’s not bad. I can see the added light but it doesn’t feel like the image is rich. I don’t feel the richness you get when you’re at ISO 800 and either ½ or 1 ½-stops over on the sensor.

Ungraded +1 Overexposed vs. Graded +1 Overexposed

**The key light is reading at f/2.8, which overexposes our sensor by 1-stop.**

By giving the sensor more light at 1-stop, it seems that the noise in the image is not as extreme. 1-stop over looks pretty darn good at ISO 1600.  I’m starting to feel that this could be a good place to overexpose the camera on this ISO.

Ungraded +1.5 Overexposed vs. Graded +1.5 Overexposed

**The key light is reading at f/2.8 5/10, which overexposes our sensor by 1 ½-stops.**

This even looks better than 1-stop over! Both Monette and Chelsea are really starting to pop from the background. So I’d say at ISO 1600, your goal would be at a 1-stop or 1 ⅓-stop over on the sensor. This is very common with the RED or film. When I’m shooting those formats, I want to make sure I go over by a stop or so to get the most out of the image. That’s always been the way I expose my negative and digital negative.

Ungraded +2 Overexposed vs. Graded +2 Overexposed

**The key light is reading at f/2.8, which overexposes our sensor by 2-stops.**

At 2-stops over on the sensor, we continue to retain detail and the image is 100% usable. There is nothing jumping out that looks clipped. Plus the noise seems to be leaving a low-footprint in the overall image.

Ungraded +2.5 Overexposed vs. Graded +2.5 Overexposed

**The key light is reading at f/2.8 5/10, which overexposes our sensor by 2 ½-stops.**

I felt the “sweet spot” at ISO 1600 was 1 ½-stops overexposed. So what we are going to do is pull that image back to try and match it to 1 ½-stops over.

Graded +1.5 Overexposed vs. Color Corrected To Match Graded +2.5 Overexposed

Now we are going to readjust our eyes to the 1 ½-stops over and cross-compare it to the 2 ½-stops over.

I’m starting to see that Monette’s face is starting to bloom once graded. But when you look at the RAW file, you can still see that all the information is still there to play with. When we bring the image back to match 1 ½-stops, it looks pretty close in comparison. You are able to see the subtle details in the skin at 1 ½-stops, and you are starting to lose them at 2 ½-stops. But overall, it’s doing a tremendous job on holding the image and bringing it back to match. It’s pretty impressive that at 2 ½-stops the image is holding this well!

Ungraded +3 Overexposed vs. Graded +3 Overexposed

**The key light is reading at f/5.6, which overexposes our sensor by 3-stops.**

At 3-stops over they definitely looked clipped when the look is applied. What we are searching for is that breaking point in the sensor. When you look in the ungraded image, they aren’t clipped at all. They still maintain detail when dialed into ISO 1600 at 3-stops over.

Ungraded +3.5 Overexposed vs. Graded +3.5 Overexposed

**The key light is reading at f/4 5/10, which overexposes our sensor by 3 ½-stops.**

At 3 ½-stops over, I’m not seeing any of the highlights clipping in the ungraded. The detail is still retained after all the light is pumped into it. When we switch over to the graded image you can see that they are both blown out.

Graded +1.5 Overexposed vs. Color Corrected To Match Graded +3.5 Overexposed

We are now going to reorient our eyes back to the 1 ½-stops over and cross-compare it to 3 ½-stops over. At 1 ½-stops over ungraded, the image is looking balanced. At 3 ½-stops ungraded, you can tell that our image is coming in hot. We are still retaining all of the detail, though. Once we bring the image back it looks good. We’ve retained all of the detail and at 3 ½-stops over, it is a usable image. You can see that the light in the background has dropped significantly, but that’s due to pulling everything back to our desired mark.

Ungraded +4 Overexposed vs. Graded +4 Overexposed

**The key light is reading at f/8, which overexposes our sensor by 4-stops.**

Once again, this is teaching us that we can crank some serious light into this camera and it will maintain detail. If we have overexposure scenarios or extreme settings, we are able to judge how many stops over we can let it pop before we have too much light.

Ungraded +4.5 Overexposed vs. Graded +4.5 Overexposed

**The key light is reading at f/5.6 5/10, which overexposes our sensor by 4 ½-stops.**

It looks like we are continuing to get detail in the image in our RAW file, even if we are blown out in the graded version.

Graded +1.5 Overexposed vs. Color Corrected To Match Graded +4.5 Overexposed

When we bring 4 ½-stops back to 1 ½-stops you can see that our background has gotten significantly darker. This is due to needing to bring them down to match levels. When looking at the detail, I have to say it looks like it might possibly retain more than 4 ½-stops under at ISO 800. By bumping up to ISO 1600, it seems to me we are gaining a bit more latitude in the highlight area. But we are gaining more fixed pattern noise.

Ungraded +5 Overexposed vs. Graded +5 Overexposed

**The key light is reading at f/11, which overexposes our sensor by 5-stops.**

At 5-stops over, that RAW file is looking almost clipped. When you throw the LUT on, it’s completely blown out. We are at the point where we can no longer see Monette’s facial features.

Ungraded +5.5 Overexposed vs. Graded +5.5 Overexposed

**The key light is reading at f/2.8 5/10, which overexposes our sensor by 5 ½-stops.**

So now we are at 5 ½-stops over on the sensor. If you remember at ISO 800, Monette was clipping on her head. So let’s see if we gain that extra latitude with ISO 1600 if we try to bring it back.

Graded +1.5 Overexposed vs. Color Corrected To Match Graded +5.5 Overexposed

Now we’ve pulled the 5 ½-stops back and I am not seeing it clip in the highlights yet. This is now fact that when you shoot ISO 1600, you are gaining more in overexposure latitude. At ISO 800, Monette’s face was clipping, and at ISO 1600, it’s not. This is why we do these types of tests. We’ve already found out that at ISO 1600 I am going to gain at least another stop of latitude.

I feel that even with the fixed pattern noise we are getting this is something we should be able to clean up in post. So when you are going into those extreme scenarios where you have very high contrast, then maybe ISO 1600 is a very good way of going about it. That way you can combat that type of extreme. For example, the sun shines through the window, and we get a little bit of bounce coming off the wall onto the subject; but you want to hold that detail in the hot highlights and expose their faces.

Ungraded +6 Overexposed vs. Graded +6 Overexposed

**The key light is reading at f/16, which overexposes our sensor by 6-stops.**

Now we are 6-stops over on the sensor. We won’t be able to bring 6-stops back, but I guarantee that looking at this in the RAW file, she has definitely clipped. So the breaking point at ISO 1600 is 6-stops over. With ISO set at 800, it broke apart at 5 ⅓-stops over.

What Have We Learned?

  • You get about 1-stop more in latitude when set at 1600 ISO.
  • This is a sensor that absolutely needs light — you don’t want to try and underexpose it.
  • When the sensor gets close to clipping, you can see some yellow shift in the skin tone.
  • About 6-stops over, the image starts to hit the breaking point and becomes smokey. You can see that it clips in the RAW file and has lost some detail in the image.  

This concludes PART 1 of our Blackmagic URSA Mini 4.6K Film Test. I hope this has been an informative experience and will help bring your knowledge of this camera to new heights! I want to make sure you’re ready to tackle the field with the URSA Mini. If you have any questions or concerns, please give us a shout in the comment section!

Next up on our list is PART 2: Overexposure/Skin Tone Test!

We’re going to review the the opposite end of the spectrum and find out how this sensor holds up when attacking it with a whole lot of light! Stay tuned as PART 2 rolls out the door tomorrow, December 22nd, 2016. For a more indepth analysis, as well as tons of other resources that can elevate your career in film, become a member of Shane’s Inner Circle today!

Best,

Shane Hurlbut, ASC

This concludes our film test section. Sign up for Shane’s Inner Circle for access to full articles like these. Don’t miss out!

Now, let’s take a look at our table of contents to see what we’ve covered and where we’re heading:

PART 1: Overexposure and Skin Tone

PART ONE TOTAL VIDEO CONTENT: 1 HOURS 20 MINUTES

  • Overexposure at ISO 800 – Runtime 9 minutes 35 seconds
  • Overexposure at ISO 800 Shane’s Review – Runtime 16 minutes 14 seconds (SIC EXCLUSIVE)
  • Overexposure at ISO 1600 – Runtime 8 minutes 21 seconds
  • Overexposure at ISO 1600 Shane’s Review – Runtime 17 minutes 1 seconds (SIC EXCLUSIVE)
  • Overexposure at ISO 800 vs. ISO 1600 – Runtime 13 minutes 46 seconds (SIC EXCLUSIVE)
  • Overexposure at ISO 800 vs. ISO 1600 Shane’s Review – 16 mins 2 seconds (SIC EXCLUSIVE)

PART 2: Underexposure and Skin Tone

PART TWO TOTAL VIDEO CONTENT: 1 HOUR 21 MINUTES

  • Underexposure at ISO 800 – Runtime 10 minutes 11 seconds.
  • Underexposure at ISO 800 Shane’s Review – Runtime 18 minutes 50 seconds (SIC EXCLUSIVE)
  • Underexposure at ISO 1600 – Runtime 10 minutes 47 seconds
  • Underexposure at ISO 1600 Shane’s Review – Runtime 12 minutes 34 seconds (SIC EXCLUSIVE)
  • Underexposure ISO 800 vs. ISO 1600 – Runtime 15 minutes 50 Seconds (SIC EXCLUSIVE)
  • Underexposure ISO 800 vs. ISO 1600 Shane’s Review – Runtime 13 minutes 34 seconds (SIC EXCLUSIVE)

Part 3: Day ISO/Finding Native

PART THREE TOTAL VIDEO CONTENT: 58 MINUTES 24 SECONDS

  • Day ISO Noise Test – Runtime 3 minutes 59 seconds
  • Day ISO Noise Test Shane’s Review – Runtime 13 minutes 55 seconds (SIC EXCLUSIVE)
  • Day ISO Noise Test Compared Against ISO 400 – Runtime 4 minutes 3 seconds (SIC EXCLUSIVE)
  • Day ISO Noise Test Compared Against ISO 400 Shane’s Review – Runtime 7 minutes 32 seconds (SIC EXCLUSIVE)
  • Day ISO Noise Test Compared Against ISO 800 – Runtime 4 minutes 5 seconds (SIC EXCLUSIVE)
  • Day ISO Noise Test Compared Against ISO 800 Shane’s Review – Runtime 13 minutes 18 seconds (SIC EXCLUSIVE)
  • Day ISO Noise Test Compared Against ISO 1600 – Runtime 4 minutes 2 seconds (SIC EXCLUSIVE)
  • Day ISO Noise Test Compared Against ISO 1600 Shane’s Review – Runtime 7 minutes 30 seconds (SIC EXCLUSIVE)

Here’s a look at what’s to come in Shane’s Inner Circle  for Parts 1 – 3:

Part 4: Color Correcting Your Blackmagic URSA Mini 1

PART FOUR TOTAL VIDEO CONTENT:  7 minutes 13 seconds

  • Color Grading Day Exteriors with DaVinci Resolve  – Runtime 7 minutes 13 seconds

Part 5: Color Correcting Your Blackmagic URSA Mini 2

PART FIVE TOTAL VIDEO CONTENT: 8 MINUTES 34 SECONDS

  • Color Grading without a LUT Under Tungsten Lighting – 5 minutes 14 seconds
  • Color Grading under Mixed Color Temp Sources – 3 minutes 20 seconds

Part 6: Combating IR Pollution Using Straight NDs and IR NDs

PART SIX TOTAL VIDEO CONTENT: 51 MINUTES 01 SECONDS

  • IR Pollution Test with Straight ND – Runtime 6 minutes 46 seconds
  • IR Pollution Test with Straight ND Shane’s Review – Runtime 19 minutes 25 seconds (SIC EXCLUSIVE)
  • IR Pollution Test with Tiffen IR ND – Runtime 6 minutes 44 seconds (SIC EXCLUSIVE)
  • IR Pollution Test with Tiffen IR ND Shane’s Review – Runtime 18 minutes 06 seconds (SIC EXCLUSIVE)

Part 7: Combating IR Pollution with True NDs & Our Battle Royale Finale

PART SEVEN TOTAL VIDEO CONTENT: 45 MINUTES 32 SECONDS

  • IR Pollution Test with True ND – Runtime 6 minutes 29 seconds
  • IR Pollution Test with True ND Shane’s Review – Runtime 16 minutes 01 seconds (SIC EXCLUSIVE)
  • IR Pollution Test ND Battle Royale – Runtime 4 minutes 55 seconds (SIC EXCLUSIVE)
  • IR Pollution Test ND Battle Royale Shane’s Review – Runtime 18 minutes 07 seconds (SIC EXCLUSIVE)

Part 8: Night ISO Test

PART EIGHT TOTAL VIDEO CONTENT:  19 MINUTES 49 SECONDS

  • Night ISO Noise Test with Chelsea – Runtime 3 minutes 04 seconds
  • Night ISO Noise Test with Chelsea Shane’s Review – Runtime 5 minutes 46 seconds (SIC EXCLUSIVE)
  • Night ISO Noise Test with Mason – Runtime 2 minutes 33 seconds (SIC EXCLUSIVE)
  • Night ISO Noise Test with Mason Shane’s Review – Runtime 3 minutes 18 seconds (SIC EXCLUSIVE)
  • Night ISO Noise Test with Chelsea vs. Mason – Runtime 5 minutes 08 seconds (SIC EXCLUSIVE)

Part 9: Rolling Shutter Test

PART NINE TOTAL VIDEO CONTENT: 8 MINUTES 06 SECONDS

  • Rolling Shutter Test with Car – Runtime 1 minutes 41 seconds (SIC EXCLUSIVE)
  • Rolling Shutter Test with Car Shane’s Review – Runtime 6 minutes 25 seconds  (SIC EXCLUSIVE)

All videos were edited on HP Z840 workstations using HP Z24x DreamColor monitors.

Order Black Magic URSA Mini Camera Test Series Part 1-9

Click to order Blackmagic URSA Mini Camera Test Series: Part 1 – 9

 


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7 comments

Cedric Akins December 21, 2016 at 12:41 PM

How were you able to pull the image back down being 5.5-6 stops over exposed?

Reply
Cedric Akins December 21, 2016 at 12:45 PM

Have you ever considered doing this same type of test with the pocket cinema camera?

Reply
Robert Queensborough December 24, 2016 at 7:29 AM

Thanks for getting some dark skin in there. I see for the test both subjects are exposed for the one lighting setup, but in practice would you light the differently?

Reply
William December 25, 2016 at 2:14 AM

Hi Shane
first, massive thanks for the time you spend on thoses tests, for junior/indie cinematographer, like me, who can’t do really precise test, this is just gold ! I will try the inner circle in 2017, contents sounds crazy

Back to this test, with my own unscientific / ununiform test, i have founded that 800 +1 stop was the ideal target for best dynamic range, glade to see that i’m not so far from your result !

in the test you explain that the target for iso 800 +1.5stop exposure is IRE values at 55-65, how do you monitor it please ?
do you apply the rec709 lut to monitor it in video range ?
on the ursa mini, false color show that 50 ire is 38,4%, how can I know where is the 55-65 (or any other value) equivalent in Ursa log ?
actually i expose using the “caucasian skintone” meter to have 1stop over the mid grey, but i don’t know how to be more precise.
maybe the answer is for inner circle content only

thank you and merry christmas

Reply
William January 19, 2017 at 11:20 PM

Hi shane, maybe you didn’t see my comment before because of holidays , any chance to have an answer about it ?
thank you

Reply
Kahleem Poole January 20, 2017 at 7:31 AM

SO AWESOME; I’ve been patiently awaiting your overview of the Ursa 4.6 for awhile now (but I know how busy you are).
I’ll be studying this like mad as the Ursa is my next go-to favorite platform after so much experience w/ the Pocket and other bodies now.
BTW, THANK YOU for showing Dark AND Light skintones, Shane. Mucho appreciated!
-KahL

Reply
david June 21, 2017 at 6:06 AM

If using this camera learn how to expose skin tones with false colour. Pink for caucasian skin and green for dark skin. Boom! set your function 1 button to toggle on/off.

Reply

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