Home Camera HDSLR Educational Series for Cinema: A Joint Venture with B&H

HDSLR Educational Series for Cinema: A Joint Venture with B&H

written by Shane Hurlbut, ASC

Visit the B&H HDSLR Hub Now

Hurlbut Visuals Intro Credits
Motion Graphics Artist: Zak Stoltz
Producer: Julien Lasseur

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74 comments

Tweets that mention HDSLR Educational Series for Cinema A Joint Venture with Hurlbut Visuals and B&H | Hurlbut Visuals -- Topsy.com February 21, 2011 at 9:25 PM

[…] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Jeff Hanley, Jeremy Widen, Filmguy, Vision Wrangler, Shane Hurlbut, ASC and others. Shane Hurlbut, ASC said: HDSLR Educational Series for Cinema – A Joint Venture with B&H http://ow.ly/40Ha1 http://ow.ly/40KZk […]

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mel haynes February 21, 2011 at 10:49 PM

Wow, Shane, the giving never ends. What a great gift to us. Very much looking forward to this series. Thanks for for all that you give to the revolution.

Mel

P.S. what is the dress code for this revolution? Do we need a uniform?

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Shane February 21, 2011 at 10:51 PM

mel haynes, the dress code is your birthday suit baby!!! Thank you so much for your kind words.

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mel haynes February 22, 2011 at 4:50 PM

haha lets hope its not too cold then

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George E. Kennedy, Jr. February 21, 2011 at 10:59 PM

It already feels like Christmas 2011. This is going to be a great year for creatives. Shane you are leading the way. I hope I meet you at NAB so I can say it to you. BRAVO

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Shane February 21, 2011 at 11:39 PM

George E. Kennedy, Jr., I cannot thank you enough for all of your support. Unfortunately I will miss NAB this year, I am shooting KIN till May. We will hook up.

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Jerry Rojas February 21, 2011 at 11:11 PM

Wow Wow Wow! I’m speechless! Both trailers are great. This will be awesome!
You are not inspiring one filmmaker at a time, you are inspiring people worldwide.

Thanks

JR

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Shane February 21, 2011 at 11:41 PM

Jerry Rojas, Thank you so much my friend. We are trying to do just that, but do it from a personal, intimate level like the blog. Answering one comment at a time. That is the way we do it here. I am glad you liked them. Julien rocked the HV intro out I thought. That filmmaker is going to go places.

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Charles February 22, 2011 at 11:21 AM

Yeah, I feel like I’m part of something, this is exciting… (Well, Greg Yaitanes said this actually. Executive Producer and Director of the “House” Season Finale. Broadcast in Holland in August 2010.)
Educational Series is a great idea. We look forward to it!

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Shane February 22, 2011 at 11:10 PM

Charles, I hope you enjoy them. It was a labor of love for me and my Elite team. They are coming your way next week.

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Marlon February 22, 2011 at 1:30 PM

Very Cool!! my birthday suit is in the dry cleaners!!! im tune’d in!!!

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Travis Guerra February 22, 2011 at 1:41 PM

YES YES!!!!! I cant wait for this!!! Thank you Shane!!!!!!!!! This will be the Holy Grail for 5D Mark II users.

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Shane February 22, 2011 at 11:09 PM

Travis Guerra, it does contain a lot of great information. You are very welcome. Thank you for your support.

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Carlo February 22, 2011 at 6:26 PM

WOW!
Thank you!
This is great news. Great news!!!

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Shane February 22, 2011 at 11:06 PM

Carlo, you are so welcome. Please enjoy!

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Chris Fig February 23, 2011 at 12:40 AM

Certainly looking forward to watching the series and learning very valuable information. Thank you Shane and B&H.

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Shane February 23, 2011 at 1:24 PM

Chris Fig, Thank you so much for your support, I think you will all enjoy these episodes.

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Rey February 23, 2011 at 2:46 AM

Can’t wait for this!

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Shane February 23, 2011 at 1:24 PM

Rey, I think all of you will enjoy this. Thanks for your support.

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Matt Short February 23, 2011 at 8:08 AM

Awesome. I can’t wait for this. Shane, the one lesson everyone should be getting from all this is, don’t let the dust settle under your feet! Dude, do you ever sleep?

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Shane February 23, 2011 at 1:23 PM

Matt Short, LOL Yes of course, I enjoy life to the fullest. Carpe diem.

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El Sachmo February 23, 2011 at 2:14 PM

Shane,

This makes me want to roll around in sugar glass while playing a trumpet! I’m excited to watch your series my good man! This will teach me so much and allow me to improve for my new Car drifting film series I’m doing!

Thanks man!

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Shane February 23, 2011 at 3:12 PM

El Sachmo, yeah baby, that sounds very cool. Glad I could help. That visual with the sugar glass scares me a little bit. LOL

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Ken Kilen February 23, 2011 at 5:17 PM

Most excellent! Can’t wait to get into this. We’re about to make the change from video cameras to HDSLRs for Video Arts. Could not be more timely!

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Didier Clermont February 23, 2011 at 5:58 PM

Wow!!! Shane only one word can describe how I feel right now Wow!!! you never stop giving, and never expect anything back that’s what I call genuine love for what you do. You are a pioneer, innovative, creative with the DSLR’s to sum it all up “you the man”

GOD Bless

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Shane February 23, 2011 at 7:47 PM

Didier Clermont, Thank you so much for those kind words and your continued support, we are on fire this year and just getting warmed up. The water white sets you can get and B & H or Film Tools.

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Didier Clermont February 24, 2011 at 10:12 AM

Appreciate it Shane gonna check-it out.

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Didier Clermont February 23, 2011 at 6:15 PM

Hey shane do you have a specific link, or more like a direct link to buy all the ND Whites trying to get the whole package.

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Didier Clermont February 24, 2011 at 10:15 AM

One more thing Shane when I receive updates from your blog to email it shows up under spam for some reason just putting it out there so you know, and that it does not happen to others as well cause I don’t think anybody would want to miss-out any info.

GOD Bless

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Leonard Monkey February 24, 2011 at 5:19 PM

Is giving away this much information legal ?

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Shane February 25, 2011 at 8:54 AM

Leonard Monkey, yes and we are!!!

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John Novotny February 25, 2011 at 4:20 AM

I laughed, I cried, I can’t wait for more. 🙂

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Thomas February 25, 2011 at 8:03 AM

What is the score of the B&H Trailer? Love it!

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Jon Bush February 26, 2011 at 9:17 AM

Will tomorrow ever get here. I wanted to let you know how much I am looking forward to the series. Thank you for taking the time to help and inspire.

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Shane February 26, 2011 at 2:19 PM

Jon Bush, you are very welcome.

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Stefan February 26, 2011 at 2:19 PM

I send all the best from Austria. I’m so glad you give all this. Thanks

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Shane February 26, 2011 at 2:25 PM

Stefan, thank you so much and it is my pleasure.

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Luis E. March 1, 2011 at 4:30 PM

GOD!!!

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Shane March 1, 2011 at 4:52 PM

Luis E., Did you like it?

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Luis E. March 3, 2011 at 4:29 PM

You inspired and amazed me from the beginning. But you are going beyond, giving, sharing, living.

Thank you for being the guy that you are. It makes me think of you as one of the best DPs out there.

I am more than flattered with your philosophy and way of thinking.

Im more than anything learning to be a better person, consequently better in my work.

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Shane March 7, 2011 at 12:07 AM

Luis E., that is one of the nicest things anyone has ever said to me. I thank you and love that you support this blog.

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lEO March 2, 2011 at 9:22 AM

Hi Shane,

Great info….thanks for sharing….
Your comment on ISO increments of 160 didnt make sense to me…Is there some issue with the other ISO settings 200, 400, 800 etc ?

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Shane March 3, 2011 at 7:03 AM

IEO, the Canon HDSLR cameras have native ISO’s just like a film stock. So it’s native ISO is 160. Any up or down from their will be an increase in noise level compared to 160. But
If you stay in the 160 increments your noise level will be less. 100 will have much more noise than 160 and 320. I hope this helps.

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Alison March 3, 2011 at 1:42 PM

INCREDIBLE! Shane, you are creating an invaluable resource – I’m just getting started in the HDSLR realm, and JUST say Episode 1 – can’t wait for the rest!!!

Cheers,
Alison

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Shane March 7, 2011 at 12:08 AM

Alison, I am so happy that you loved it. You will get a kick out of episode II. My son rocks it out.

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Paul March 8, 2011 at 1:54 PM

Sorry, but have to ask:
Can you say what lenses were used (for number 2 of the series)?
I’d love to know specifically what the lens/aperture combo was for the wide shot of you…

thanks!

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Shane March 9, 2011 at 9:46 PM

Paul, Everything was shot on Leica glass. That wide shot was an 50mm at a f2.0, the steadicam was a 28mm at a f3.5, frontal close-up was a 180mm f3.5, and the side rake was a 100mm macro f3.5. Anything else feel free to ask

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Paul March 11, 2011 at 1:54 PM

thanks so much!!!!!

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Shane March 11, 2011 at 10:25 PM

Paul, you are very welcome

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Derek March 10, 2011 at 8:05 PM

At the part in the beginning where it says “we give back to our community” there’s a still image of Shane in what looks like Cambodia or southeast asia. Where’s he at? What shoot is that from. I’ve done a lot of shooting in Southeast asia and would love to see how Shane shoots it!

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Shane March 10, 2011 at 9:43 PM

Derek, I am in a vietnamese market just out side of Phnom Penh, Cambodia. What amazing place. I loved this country. The people, the food, the culture was off the CHAIN!!!

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Sekayi March 17, 2011 at 12:00 PM

Im a novice shooter from brooklyn, NY..i saw the last 3 minutes a while back and i really felt tht video. I watched it over and over again and even watched the making of’s a couple times. I recently purchased a 7D and my biz partner forwarded me your clip on B&H.. I had no idea you shot that! I really appreciate you putting these instructionals together for people like me and hope maybe one day you’ll see something i shoot and say ..hey..thts pretty cool…LOL

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Shane March 18, 2011 at 6:49 AM

Sekayi, thank you so much for your kind words and support. I am glad that you like the educational series. I just wanted to give back to a community that has been so gracious to me.

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Marcus.sg March 20, 2011 at 11:38 PM

Great stuff Shane, grateful to be getting the inside info from the Pro’s pro. My only gripe is that this is a Stream and not a downloadable Video Podcast. Bright Cove’s player is pretty horrible as it dynamically throttles the vision and audio. I’ve even had instances where it won’t play at all. I would hope that this would become downloadable one day soon.

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Shane March 21, 2011 at 4:53 PM

Marcus.sg, we have passed this onto B & H and we will see what they can do about it. I am not sure if there are plans of making them downloadable at a future date, still not discussed.

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Silvin Morgan March 23, 2011 at 2:49 PM

WOW!

Thank you so much for cutting through the clutter and the uncertainties of HDSLR. With this site and series for BH, you are giving us the standard guidelines to work with. I feel like this is a free internship and have learned so much already, and to get this kind of insight without actually being there is priceless…

I feel like I owe you something. I will come and work on your crew in any capacity for free, the experience alone would be worth everything to me. Yours truly, a DP in the making.

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Shane March 24, 2011 at 10:55 AM

Silvin Morgan, thank you so much for those kind words of support. I am glad you liked it. Yes, this has been a labor of love for us at Hurlbut Visuals, giving back to such a gracious HDSLR community. I will take you up on that. Are you in LA? Please contact our operations manager Anne Gaither at anne@hurlbutvisuals.com and she can set up a time for you to come in at the rental division and meet Kevin. Then we can take it to the next level and meet once I get back from Montreal.

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Jonathan Newton April 25, 2011 at 6:32 PM

Dear Shane,

I live in Australia – the backside of the film industry. We have some of the most amazing crews here however we produce a lot of ‘trash’ that never gets out of our country as it is all limited to our culture. I have always longed to change that. Change the industry here and open it up to the world with Universal stories that everyone wants to watch. One issue has always been money, and I believe that is the key issue that 99% of film makers see as a huge road block, and they slowly give up.

Then I was recommended to the B&H/HDSLR Hub website. I viewed all of these videos and they truly amazed and inspired me.

I have always known of the power of the 5DMkII as a still camera and I had seen a few clips on YouTube, however after watching you turn the camera into a cinema tool – that just blew my mind!

Suddenly thoughts from the past started to flood my mind, thoughts of films and wanna-be productions that never got off the ground due to quality V’s budget. I realised that I could go out there and produce everything I want at the minimum of cost.

Cut a long story short, I purchased my 5DMkII the day after watching your last video. I also purchased a few NDs and I am currently looking into a good Marshall monitor to get, along with a RedRock Micro DSLR package.

Now that I have found this blog website of yours, I have been even more inspired! I would like to thank you for sharing you r experience and tallent with the world and breathing new life into this creative artform.

I would love to show you the results of my first 5DMkII production when it has been finished.

Thank you and keep inspiring us all!

Warm Regards,

Jonathan Newton
info@newtelproductions.com

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Shane April 26, 2011 at 12:30 AM

Jonathan Newton, this one comment made all the hard work, stress, effort and endless hours worth collaborating with B & H. I am so glad that this reached out to you. This was our plan at Hurlbut Visuals, giving back to this amazing community that has been so gracious and giving to us. I cannot wait to see what is in store down under. ROCK IT OUT!!!

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Jonathan Newton April 26, 2011 at 5:57 AM

Thank you Shane. I shall definitely show you some work from Down here. I’m looking forward to exploring the work flow of the HDSRL.

If your work ever brings you to Melbourne, Australia, I would like to buy you lunch and a coffee and pick your brain a little more about what is possible and how things can be done.

Thanks again.

Jonathan Newton

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Shane April 27, 2011 at 1:55 AM

Jonathan Newton, thank you and I would love to grab a lunch and a coffee when I make my way there. Hopefully in the near future.

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Shane May 3, 2011 at 4:41 PM

Jonathan Newton, I cannot thank you enough for these kind words. This is awesome!!! Take this platform and create, tell these stories, bring them to life. Thank you for inspiring me with all of this wonderful support. I cannot wait to see what you create.

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Ivar Edding April 30, 2011 at 7:36 AM

Dear Shane,
Awsome series for B&H, picked up some nuggets for sure!

I have a technical question though: you state in one of the episodes that you use Adobe RGB for better skin tones. I took that advice and filmed a model shoot recently and I’ve run into issues in post. Firstly I convert all the h264’s to Prores4444, then import it into After Effects for grading, where I switch my project setting in to Adobe RGB (1998) and then interpreting the footage as Working space (i.e Adobe RGB (1998), and the skin tones really shine! Lush, full, saturated and just dang nice! But rendering to a file is another story. When I look at my rendered clips, be it Animation codec, h264, Tiff sequence or what have you, they all look duller and desaturated. What am I doing wrong?
Take these two images as an example http://www.flickr.com/photos/ivaredding/5672303476/in/photostream/ this one is a screen grab and http://www.flickr.com/photos/ivaredding/5671736913/in/photostream/ this one is rendered to file. Wow, I’m definitely missing something.

I would be very grateful for any advice.

Thank you!

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Shane May 3, 2011 at 4:48 PM

Ivar Edding, thank you so much for your kind words, here is what my Adobe Guru Mike Kanfer has to say:
Please advise the Ivar NOT to convert to ProRes before he brings the files into AE. (that will keep it the cleanest…that’s what we do best around here…we read the 7D H.264 file natively and do not add any more compression or artifacts by going to ProRes…he’s doing an un-necessary step) Have him import the file natively into AE and try again. There you go. Try this.

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Ivar Edding May 4, 2011 at 11:30 PM

Shane, I cannot thank you enough for taking the time off your busy schedule to reply me. I will definitely try to do what Mike suggests, but I don’t see how that’s going to solve the color space issue. There’s something strange happening when rendering out of AE, like some automatic sRGB LUT is being applied or something. I wish there was a way to keep those rich reds when rendering.

Anyway Shane, thank you so much for your time and effort. Your blog is a constant replenishment of inspiration. Keep rocking!

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K Wasley May 5, 2011 at 4:35 AM

what program are you using to view your rendered output file? If you are using quicktime, quicktime X looks different to quicktime 7. Have you tried viewing through quicktime 7 with ‘final cut compatibility’ turned on? Or are you a PC guy in which case that’s a foreign world to me!

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Ivar Edding May 11, 2011 at 3:51 PM

Hey K Wasley! Thanks for your input!
🙂 I’m a Mac guy since my first computer. And the first thing I did when I got this one was to remove the incredibly annoying quicktime X and installing qt 7. The picks I linked to on flickr is from After Effects, and haven’t been to FCP. Viewing in in qt or photoshop yields the same result. As I said earlier I think it’s something to do with the sRGB lut being applied at render time, OR my misunderstanding of the way to apply AdobeRGB in After Effects. What bothers me is that the monitor/computer is obviously able to show the more saturated lush colors, so why can’t it produce a render that looks like that?

Ivar Edding May 30, 2011 at 4:01 AM

I managed to figure out what was going wrong, and thought I’d share it here for anyone who finds this informative.

– My mistake was to set the working space (in the project setting) to AdobeRGB(1998) and then interpret the clips as working space, i.e AdobeRGB(1998). This made the renders look bad regardless of the output profile.
– When I changed my working space to anything else, say sRGB or Rec709, the clips all looked washed out already in the comp viewer in AE.
– Here’s my mistake: I had interpreted the clips as working space, so when I let the working space be sRGB, and the interpreted the clips as AdobeRGB(1998) – boom! They all looked good again! And now when rendering with the ouput profile as working space (sRGB), the renders look as expected.
– Triumph!

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Shane May 30, 2011 at 1:10 PM

Ivar Edding, so through all of this. What was the setting on the camera? sRGB or Adobe RGB??

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Ivar Edding May 31, 2011 at 3:46 AM

AdobeRGB was the camera setting, clip interpreted as AdobeRGB in AE, and working space as whatever the output is intended to be, in my case sRGB.

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Philipvw June 13, 2011 at 7:29 AM

Hi Ivar,
I’ve been looking into aRGB 1998 as well, but I couldn’t find THE correct color management settings too. But you seem THE only one asking on THE web. So, do you get correct colors when interpreting footage as aRGB 1998, working space aRGB 1998, and when exporting setting ‘OUTPUT module’ (located at render queue) to sRGB..

Please answer, because I can’t seem to find THE correct answer
thanks!
Phil

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Ivar Edding June 14, 2011 at 3:50 AM

Hey Phil!

Yeah, I had a hard time finding the answer myself, but here’s a link to a post I made in Creative Cow that helped me get on track. http://forums.creativecow.net/thread/2/1000730

Short version though is your best bet is to set the working space to whatever your output will be, i.e. if you plan on outputting to sRGB, then set working space to sRGB. Then you’ll work in the color space in AE that you’ll be outputting to, and what you see in the comp viewer will be what you get in the end. But if you shot using aRGB1998, you need to interpret the clips as such. As long as you do this, you can set your working space as whatever you like, e.g sRGB, Rec709 etc. When you output, you don’t need to color manage the output, just use working space and there will be no nasty surprises.

Good luck!

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